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2015 CAMPAIGN PROMISES FULFILLED (see link for issues that I wrote about in 2015, and have passed legislation to fulfill those campaign promises.)

2015 CAMPAIGN PROMISES – MORE TO DO! (see link for issues that I wrote about during the 2015 campaign for an update about what's been done to-date and what we have left to fulfill those promises.)

OTHER ACCOMPLISHMENTS (see link for a list of issues I've fought for and achieved real progress on since 2015.)

AND IMPORTANTLY THERE IS ALL OF THE DISTRICT 1 SPECIFIC WORK I’VE CHAMPIONED (see link for all issues related specifically for District 1 that I've worked on over the last three years)

 

 

2015 Campaign Promises Fulfilled

1. Ending preferences for tenants employed by select employers

During my campaign I wrote committing to pursue a Source of Income anti-discrimination law to protect tenants from being discriminated against because of where they work or their source of income"

✔ I introduced legislation, passed by the Council, prohibiting Source of Income Discrimination in 2017.

2. Public safety is important to all the neighborhoods of District 1

During my campaign I wrote committing to restore the popular Community Service Officers (CSO) program.

✔ The Council voted to restore funding for the CSO program in 2017. In 2018 we moved towards implementation that will happen THIS year! Since I have been on the Council we have approved creating 112 new police patrol positions - the largest patrol expansion since the ‘70s.

3. Improve public safety through innovation

During my campaign I wrote committing to expand LEAD, the Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) program that diverts low-level offenders to rehabilitation, services, and treatment rather than jail. This program has had extraordinary success in changing people's lives.

✔ The Council voted to expand LEAD to the South and Southwest Precinct in November 2018.

4. Committed to enacting workers’ rights

During my campaign I wrote committing to pursue policies ensuring that Seattle’s Office of Labor Standards is funded adequately; supporting a “private right of action” for employees, and secure scheduling policies for workers working for large retail and food service establishments.

✔ I worked to fully fund the Office of Labor Standards including funding for outreach and education in 2016.

✔ I introduced legislation, passed by the Council, to enact a “private right of action” for employees, to supplement enforcement, in 2016.

✔ I introduced legislation, passed by the Council, to pass secure scheduling policies for workers working for large retail and food service establishments in 2016.

5. Codifying a police observer’s Bill of Rights

During my campaign - after learning of a 2015 legal settlement resulting from a woman observing an arrest and wrongfully arrested and held in jail - I made a commitment to pass legislation promoting the rights of Seattle residents to peacefully observe and record public police activity.

✔ I introduced legislation, passed by the Council, to create a police observer’s Bill of Rights in 2017.

6. Mitigating transportation impacts due to development

During my campaign I wrote about requiring developers to mitigate transportation impacts in new developments. In 2018, the Council updated neighborhood parking  regulations to expand the definition of frequent transit service and reduce parking requirements.

✔ I introduced several amendments to curb the affects of the legislation, many of them were accepted; however, the final version of the legislation still did not address all of my concerns and I ultimately voted against the bill.

✔ I proposed and passed an amendment to the parking legislation to exempt the Fauntleroy community from the new off street parking requirements which would have reduced parking in the neighborhood which is already stressed by traffic from the ferry terminal.

2015 Campaign Promises - More to Do!

7. Supporting gender pay equity

I wrote committing to pursue paid family leave for City employees during my campaign. Seattle has the widest gender wage gap of the top 50 metropolitan areas—women only make 73 cents for every dollar men make; women of color have an even larger wage gap.

✔ The Council passed a paid family leave benefit for City employees in 2017 (The Washington State Legislature passed a family leave law in 2018).

+ There's more work to be done. Seattle should enact a wage transparency law for employees of companies that have public works contracts with the City. In addition, this law should require that other employers in Seattle not prohibit an employee from disclosing the employee’s own wages, discussing the wages of others, or inquiring about another employee’s wages. A law like this already exists in jurisdictions all over the nation.

8. Supporting local authority for Seattle

During my campaign I wrote about a resolution sponsored by then Councilmember Tim Burgess to ask the state legislature to restore local authority to consider all of the different local options to regulate rent.

✔ The State Legislature had its first hearing on repealing the law prohibiting cities from regulating rent in 2018.

+ This will be an issue in the 2019 State Legislative Session as will several bills to address the unfairness in Washington State eviction process.

9. Seeking new funding sources to ensure growth pays for growth

During my campaign I wrote that the costs of growth shouldn’t fall on residents who are increasingly being priced out of Seattle. Impact fees on developers are a proven way to ensure that growth pays to mitigate its impacts.

✔ In 2017, with Resolution 31732, the Council docketed consideration of Comprehensive Plan amendments for impact fees. Myself and Councilmembers O’Brien and Bagshaw wrote about our commitment to this effort here. But for a legal appeal from opponents of Impact Fees, we were poised to in December 2018, consider these Comprehensive Plan amendments for a transportation impact fee program.

✔ In 2017, the Council voted to support my proposal to enact utility impact fees on developers so that these costs don’t fall on the ratepayers. Our utility costs are high enough. Charges to recoup the full cost of water connection fees were implemented in 2018.

+There’s more work to be done… There are still more utility system development impact fees to enact and we need to put transportation impact fees in place as well. The Council has both on its workplan this year!

10. Improving food quality and access in District 1

I wrote about communities in District 1 lacking access to healthy food during my campaign.

✔ Starting in 2017, the Council provided new funding to expand access to healthy foods. Fresh Bucks can be used in food deserts in High Point and South Park, specifically the farm stand at High Point and El Paso in South Park. Fresh Bucks sales at farmers markets and grocery stores in the first two months of 2018 increased 163% over last year.

+ There’s more work to be done; the Delridge Community Food Co-op has taken a new step in its development. Hopefully 2019 will be the year it opens!

11. Ensuring a preservation strategy

During my campaign I wrote about the thousands of units of private, unsubsidized and affordable homes that are vulnerable to redevelopment with the incentive created by proposed upzones to tear down existing housing.

✔ Urged Executive to use a Displacement Risk Analysis in the Mandatory Housing Affordability rezone proposal leading to recommendations for minimum rezones in high displacement risk areas of South Park and Westwood/Highland Park.

✔ Led Council to vote to support legislation that will preserve the ability to extract higher fees in the future from developers for affordable housing in areas of high displacement risk.

+ There’s more work to be done; I’m working on an inventory of D1 historic landmarks to ensure the Mandatory Housing Affordability upzones don’t incentivize demolition of these properties that are a bridge to Seattle history and culture in a rapidly changing city.

+ I’m working to enact Community Resident Preferences to address historic and current displacement by providing preference for community residents in new developments. If done correctly, these policies could provide affordable housing opportunities, support at-risk communities, and reduce segregation.

MHA will only be an effective anti-displacement strategy if it results in more units of affordable housing being built in areas of high risk of displacement than are demolished through redevelopment of existing “naturally occurring affordable housing.”

We need to use SEPA authority & the legal obligation cities have to affirmatively further fair housing in order to require replacement housing for naturally affordable housing units lost to demolition & redevelopment. The obligation cities have to affirmatively further fair housing means, that when we become aware that people of color and members of other protected classes (women, our elders, people who identify as LGBTQ, and our disabled neighbors) are being disproportionately displaced, government has an obligation to act in order to counter segregation. I am proposing legislation to address this obligation in March of this year. This is the issue that most inspired me to run for Council. Please support my efforts.

Other Accomplishments

12. ...Support small and woman and minority-owned businesses

✔ I passed legislation in 2016 to remove the sunset clause allowing businesses to continue charging the five-cent bag charge so they can recoup the cost of paper bags. Seattle implemented the plastic bag ban in 2012, it had a 2016 sunset on the five-cent paper bag charge. Businesses needed a way to keep paying for the bags to support our climate change goals!

✔ Business license fee restructure – I insisted on holding these 85% of businesses harmless from the increase. When, in 2017, the Council adjusted the fee to help fund new police positions, I insisted on holding small businesses harmless from the increase. They paid no increase; businesses earning more than $2 million in annual revenue bore the majority of these increased costs.

✔ I exempted most businesses from the Secure Scheduling Ordinance, the legislation that gives employees of very large retail and food service restaurants advance notice of their schedules so they can plan for second job schedules, school, and meet family obligations.

✔ I have been working since 2016 to develop a new Legacy Business Program that in 2019 will work with communities to nominate one Legacy Business in each of Seattle’s seven Council Districts.

✔ I was the only Councilmember to vote against two laws that impact small businesses and the vitality of neighborhood business districts. I, alone, voted no against the regressive sugary drinks tax. I, alone, also voted against the expansion of “no parking development required” areas because the law did not provide for an exception for areas with parking at 85% of capacity.

✔ When the Council passed the University District Mandatory Housing Affordability upzones, small business owners on the Ave reached out to me for help. Together we convinced the Council to exempt the Ave from the upzones.

✔ In response to neighborhood business district requests to help address low level crimes, the Council voted to expand LEAD to the South and Southwest Precinct in November 2018. The Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) program diverts low-level offenders to rehabilitation, services, and treatment rather than jail and has had extraordinary success in supporting the safety and vitality of our neighborhood business districts.

✔ I sponsored amendments to the 2015 Priority Hire program that helps women, people of color, and those from economically disadvantaged zip codes to develop careers in the construction industry by requiring contractors to meet hiring goals on City funded public works jobs. The 2016 Priority Hire Annual Report and another report from the Priority Hire Advisory Committee (PHAC) recommended changes to allow more women and minority-owned businesses to participate and secure city contracts.

✔Worked to Support Small Businesses on 23rd Avenue to Get a Business Stabilization Plan. I used my Civil Rights, Utilities, Economic Development, and Arts Committee to support small businesses to successfully call for the creation of a 650,000 Business Stabilization Fund to mitigate impacts from a SDOT project. The funds went towards debt and recouping expenses, in order to sustain businesses through construction. 22 businesses were eligible for direct financial assistance.

✔ As a Flood Control District (FCD) Advisory Committee member, I worked to secure $14.9 million for 2 urban flood control projects in District 1, including the South Park Drainage Conveyance Improvement Project and the Puget Way Culvert Replacement Project. These projects will help the businesses in South Park and along West Marginal Way by providing a system to manage the stormwater and address flooding.

✔ I have worked with each of the business districts in Luna Park and Fauntleroy to reduce impacts on parking availability resulting from major SDOT capital projects in both areas.

13. ...Empower our LGBTQ community

✔ Created a funding priority in the 2017 Housing Levy to fund LGBTQ senior housing.

✔ Worked with Gender Justice League and LGBTQ Commission in 2018 to get Kaiser Permanente to overturn harmful policy that was barrier to transgender healthcare access.

✔ Supported Council funding in 2017 for Report on Aging in Community: Addressing Inequities in LGBTQ Housing and Senior Services commissioned by the Seattle Office of Housing (OH) to examine the needs of LGBTQ older adults.

✔ Successfully championed Transgender Economic Empowerment Program funding to help transgender and gender nonconforming residents receive healthcare, legal, and employment assistance.

✔ In 2018, I led the Council to direct the Human Services Department to develop new guidelines for homeless service provision guidelines for LGBTQ persons. We must ensure access to housing, services and facilities for transitioning, genderqueer and/or gender non-conforming individuals, allowing individuals to self-identify when accessing services regardless of identity documents, and enhancing access to bathrooms and other potentially gender segregated spaces/services.

14. ...Promote civil rights

✔ In 2016, I sponsored legislation creating a new civil legal aid program to help keep people from losing housing, public benefits, driver’s licenses, professional licenses, and addressing other civil issues that arise in the course of a legal defense for an unrelated charge.

✔ With the help of the Fair Chance Housing Taskforce, the Fair Chance Housing legislation was co-sponsored by myself and Council President Harrell and passed unanimously by Council in August 2017.

✔ With the help of the Commission for People with DisAbilities (PwD), I supported the 2017 end of the subminimum wage for people with disabilities.

✔ Working with the Coalition Ending Gender-Based Violence and the Silence Breakers, in 2018 I sponsored legislation that extended the Statute of Limitation (SOL) for sexual harassment in employment and contracting to one and a half years and extends the SOL for sexual harassment in public accommodations
to one year.

✔ In 2018, the City Council passed legislation I introduced amending the Open Housing Ordinance for tenants with disabilities to close loopholes in the obligation of public housing to provide reasonable accommodations to tenants with disabilities.

✔ In 2018, the Seattle Channel began to include closed-captioning for City Council meetings in order to implement funding I led the Council to provide for that purpose in 2017.

✔ In 2018, the City Council passed a Domestic Worker’s Bill of Rights, including legislation I sponsored to extend protections against harassment and discrimination.

15. ...Help Seattle Public Utility (SPU) and Seattle City Light (SCL) ratepayers

✔ After the West Seattle Helpline demonstrated the number of people that they assisted to avoid utility shutoffs, in 2016, I was able to encourage SPU to change their delinquency policies to prevent some additional shut-offs.

✔Constituents told me that Medicare premiums were being counted towards income eligibility for the Utility Discount Program (UDP). In 2017, I worked to remove it as income to qualify the UDF customers who otherwise would not have qualified.

✔ In 2017, the Council voted to support my proposal for growth to pay for growth, and enacted utility impact fees on developers so that these costs don’t fall on the ratepayers. Out utility costs are high enough.

✔ Enacted rate smoothing to prevent rate spikes that can have a detrimental effect on customers.

16. ...Promote the arts

✔ Secured funding in 2017 for the Office of Economic Development's Office of Film and Music (OFM) to support the film and media production sector. Films and television shows about Seattle should be shot in Seattle!

✔ Created a half-time liaison between the Office of Arts and Culture and the Department of Construction and Inspections to support nonprofit cultural organizations in the permitting process.

✔ Encouraged Sound Transit to develop a pilot buskers’ program which was expanded to Beacon Hill, Columbia City, Othello, Tukwila International Boulevard and Angle Lake. Prior to the program, Sound Transit didn’t allow street musicians to perform at light rail facilities.

✔ Championed funding to help address unforeseen construction costs at Town Hall.

✔ Sponsored legislation to temporarily expand the Pike Place Market Historical District in order to seek ways to save the Showbox from development.

17. ...Funding to Address the Increased Needs for Housing

✔ Led Council to authorize additional $29 million for affordable housing, funded by utilizing the City’s existing bonding capacity which is to be paid off over a 30 year term.

✔ Homeless people report criminal background as a barrier to housing. One in 3 people in Seattle have some criminal background. The Fair Chance Housing legislation was co-sponsored by myself and Council President Harrell and passed unanimously by Council in August 2017.

✔ Ensuring we are getting the outcomes we expect from human services funding: Led Council passage of an ordinance crafted with community providers, HSD, community based researchers requiring the Human Services Department to utilize a results-based framework (RBA) for designing all of its human services investments. Before passage, results-based accountability was utilized in 77% of HSD’s contracts. From January 1 through June 30, 2018 agencies receiving city funds served 18,356 households and helped 4,459 households exit to permanent housing (2,644) or maintain their housing (1,815). Our investments in 2017 resulted in 5,058 exits to permanent housing (or supporting households to maintain their permanent supportive housing) in 2017. We’ve moved almost as many people into permanent housing in the first 6 months of 2018 as we did the entire year of 2017.

✔ In 2018, I championed additional RV Remediation Funding to address issues related to clusters of illegally parked RVs, to clean the right-of-way after the RVs leave the site.

✔ Ensure that city work to remove homeless encampments focuses on those that are hazards, obstructions, or have significant public safety or public health impacts that cannot be remediated. You can find out more about that approach here as well as see the inventory of City-removed encampments.

✔ Sponsored legislation to expand discrimination protection to include people who receive alternate sources of income such as a pension, Social Security, unemployment, child support or any other governmental or non-profit subsidy, because according to the Seattle’s Renting Crisis Report, “48% of individuals who pay for rent with Social Security Disability Insurance or Social Security retirement income said that discrimination prevents them from having successful rental  applications.”

✔ Passed eviction prevention legislation to ensure that tenants can fully utilize community resources to prevent eviction. Landlords are now required to accept pledges from community-based organizations to remedy nonpayment of rent if funds are received within 3 days of an eviction notice.

✔ Supported funding to keeping the doors open for an emergency shelter serving over 230 survivors of domestic and sexual violence, funding to ensure two transitional housing for homeless foster youth programs did not close, and support for a child care program for children who are homeless, funding for homeless youth employment programs, and maintaining existing permanent supportive housing services.

✔ In 2016, I led the Council to address the accumulation of trash and the public health impacts of unsanctioned encampments. Then in the passage of the 2017 budget and again in the 2018 budget, the Mayor and City Council added additional funding for this purpose. These funds were used by Seattle Public Utilities (SPU) to develop and support three pilot programs: The Litter Pilot, The Needle Pilot, and The Unsanctioned Encampment Bag Pilot. The Unsanctioned Encampment Bag Pilot includes distributing and then collecting pre-paid color-coded bags, dumpster service, and removing additional debris as part of a self-management approach to encampment clean-up.

18. ...Promoting a Green Seattle

✔ In 2016, the Council passed the Green Pathways Resolution to support development of green jobs and a career pathway to access them. I wrote about it at the time, it required 1. a green job definition, 2) that the City create an inventory of internships, apprenticeships, and entry-level jobs at the City of Seattle that meets the green jobs definition, 3) that an outreach and engagement strategy identify barriers to success for people of color to access these jobs, and 4) that the City encourage employers to advance green jobs for people of color and other underrepresented groups. In the 2017 and 2018 budgets the Council allocated funds to support this work.

✔ I worked with Admiral residents to get shore power commitment from Port to mitigate impacts identified in Environmental Impact Statement resulting from Terminal 5 project.  I wrote the Port about the Modernization of T5 and urged them to install shore power to reduce the noise and fossil fuel emissions from idling ship engines at berth. Additionally, I advocated for crane and other dock vehicle electrification, and broadband back-up alarms to reduce impacts to District 1 communities.

✔ In 2018, I worked to require electric trucks for garbage and recycling, putting Seattle at the forefront of developing technologies in order to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions. The new contracts will result in savings of $5 million per year starting in 2019, for a total of $50 million in savings over the course of the 10-year contract.

19. ...Accountability Over Government

✔ Accountability over human services funding: Led Council passage of an ordinance crafted with community providers, HSD, and community-based researchers requiring the Human Services Department to utilize a results-based framework (RBA) for designing all of its human services investments. Before passage, results-based accountability was utilized in 77% of HSD’s contracts.

✔ Ensuring utility ratepayers don’t pay for utility costs associated with development: Instituted 100% cost recovery for developers to pay for new water taps and system development charges so existing customers are subsidizing fewer of the costs to serve new development.

✔ I opposed Seattle City Light CEO performance pay because of State Attorney General’s guidance in setting objective criteria which measures performance that exceeds the expectations of the job; then sponsored legislation to eliminate the Mayor’s authority to give City Light CEO performance pay.

✔ Street Car Project Oversight: I’ve been working towards more oversight and publicizing the problems with the First Avenue Streetcar project. I’ve supported stopping the project and an amendment I sponsored requires SDOT to continue to report on operations and constructions costs.

✔ Capital Projects Oversight: I’m reforming how the Council and departments oversee large capital projects. This work has involved getting several departments to adopt common project terminology and approval phases, and quarterly updates to the Council to identify problems early. I have successfully led the Council to pass legislation creating a new oversight policy, including creation of an annual “watch list” and requiring “stage gating” or capital projects, requiring Council approval between stages of project funding.

AND IMPORTANTLY THERE IS ALL OF THE DISTRICT 1 SPECIFIC WORK I’VE CHAMPIONED

✔ In 2016, I secured funding for the South Park Family Service Center to support health and human services, a leadership program, and an education program.

✔ In 2016, stopped the plan to sell Myers Way parcels in order to “land-bank” the site, with the help of residents in Top Hat, Highland Park, South Park, Arbor Heights, as well as Seattle Green Spaces Coalition and TreePAC. Holding such properties ensures that valuable open space is not lost, even if resources for repurposing the property are not immediately available.

✔ When, in 2016, 150 trees were illegally cut in the East Admiral neighborhood, in a potential landslide zone, I worked with the City Attorney’s Office and the Seattle Police Department to pursue sanctions to discourage those with financial means from illegal tree cutting to increase views and property values. Trees maintain soil stability, lessen landslide risk, and maintain air quality by absorbing carbon. The Parks and Recreation Department has used the settlement funds for remediation of the property.

✔ I worked with Admiral residents to get shore power commitment from Port to mitigate impacts identified in Environmental Impact Statement resulting from Terminal 5 project.  I wrote the Port about the Modernization of T5 and urged them to install shore power to reduce the noise and fossil fuel emissions from idling ship engines at berth. Additionally, I advocated for crane and other dock vehicle electrification, and broadband back-up alarms to reduce impacts to District 1 communities.

✔ Supported bringing Sound Transit light rail to West Seattle, and once approved, advocated for studying tunnel options, to maximize the long-term benefit to the community.

✔ Passed legislation in 2017 leading to 2018 development of a Vacant Building Monitoring Program to require property owners to register vacant properties, allowing the City to ensure they are maintained and secure and not become a public nuisance.West Seattle, especially South Delridge, has largest number if vacant buildings in City.

✔ In 2017, expanded the Ready to Work project into District 1 to support English learners with intensive centralized and neighborhood-based support.

✔ In 2017, supported funding for a walkable, bikeable path between Georgetown and South Park's historic "Main Streets" to connect the heart of the Duwamish Valley.

✔ Over the last couple years, I worked to get $500,000 committed to the Highland Park Roundabout project as a high priority safety and congestion relief project.

✔ I enacted recommendations of South Park Public Safety Advisory Group by getting funding passed in 2017 for the South Park Public Safety Coordinator; South Park pedestrian safety projects; lighting dark alleys and crime spots; and providing for more frequent garbage pickup.

✔ In 2017, I worked with residents of Alki and adjacent neighborhoods to develop the Alki Public Safety and Health Survey. Survey results led to a budget action, requiring the Seattle Police Department to identify new enforcement practices to address vehicle noise and cruising. In 2018 the Council adopted vehicle exhaust noise legislation that I sponsored to simplify enforcement of existing law prohibiting excessive vehicle exhaust noise.

✔ In 2017, I worked to successfully extend the Late-Night Program at the South Park Community Center to run not only on Fridays but Saturdays.

✔ I secured $1.37 million in landslide mitigation funding in 2017 for projects at SW Cambridge and California Avenue SW, the 10200 block of 47th Avenue SW, and Highland Park Way SW.

✔ I sponsored legislation to authorize a generous private donation from a D1 resident of property on the southeast edge of Schmitz Park to expand the park.

✔ I supported 2017 legislation to complete the landmarks designation process for the Campbell Building and 2018 legislation to complete the landmark designation process for the Crescent-Hamm Building in the Alaska Junction.

✔ I worked from 2016-2018 to increase bus service to Admiral, Alki, and Highland Park neighborhoods.

✔ Successfully advocated for federal construction funding for the Lander Street Overpass project, noting its importance to maintaining access to Downtown from West Seattle and South Park, with backups resulting from the daily closures of 4.5 hours.

✔ As a Flood Control District (FCD) Advisory Committee member, I worked to secure $14.9 million for 2 urban flood control projects in District 1, including the South Park Drainage Conveyance Improvement Project and the Puget Way Culvert Replacement Project. These projects will help the businesses in South Park and along West Marginal Way by providing a system to manage the stormwater and address flooding.

✔ I have worked with each of the business districts in Luna Park and Fauntleroy to reduce impacts on parking availability resulting from major SDOT capital projects in both areas.

✔ In 2018, I secured Concord Elementary $60,000 in funding for their Community Learning Center.

✔ In 2018, I championed additional RV Remediation Funding to address issues related to clusters of illegally parked RVs, to clean the right-of-way after RVs leave the site.

✔ Secured Citizenship Program funding for Neighborhood House at High Point.

✔ Secured funding to allow Colman Pool stay open for an additional 4 weekends a year.

✔ Secured funding for the Seattle Parks Department planning to enhance Trail Access on SW Brandon Street.